Donald Hays Trail Contractor Inc. Trail Builder

Welcome to the Donald Hays Trail Contractor Inc. online Trail Builder. Please answer the questions below as best you can. If you have extra comments, enter them in the extra text field at the end of each question. Each question is accompanied by explanations in the right column.

Lets get started! Please let us know the following basic information.



What's your name?


Email Address



Please let us know what city and state the trail will be in


City:

State:



Aproximately how long will the trail be in feet?




Please enter any extra information below.

How will the trail be used?


Check all that apply.


Recreational Default
Transportation

Multi Use
Other

Please enter any extra information below.

The general overall appearance of the trail system as dictated by the user group. Condition will be subjective to the user group I.e.. wheel chairs, horses or mountain bikes, and degree of perceived degradation. New trails use "install new".


Check all that apply.


Alter Function
Decommission
Expansion
Install New

Repair / Rehab
Replace in-kind
Routine Maintenance

Please enter any extra information below.

The overall width of the trail to be built or reconstructed.


Select One


<12 inches
13-18 inches
19-24 inches
25-36 inches
37-48 inches

49-60 inches
61-96 inches
96-120 inches
>121 incehs

Please enter any extra information below.

What the final walking surface will be composed of.


Check all that apply.


Native Material
Aggregate Surface
Asphalt
Chunk Wood

Concrete
RipRap
Imported Clay
Other Surfaces

Please enter any extra information below.

What will be the degree of difficulty be on this trail. Standard walking trail's percent of grades do not exceed 8% with short segments not exceeding 12 percent in 100 feet. Mountain bike downhill courses may exceed 12%.


Check all that apply.


00%-05%
05.1%-08%
08.1%-10%
10.1%-12%
12.1%-20%

20.1%-30%
30.1%-40%
40.1%-50%
>51%

Please enter any extra information below.

Side slope is the angle 90 degrees to the trail line. In other words how steep is the hill beside you as you walk.


Check all that apply.


00%-20%
21%-40%
41%-60%

61%-80%
81%-100%
>101%

Please enter any extra information below.

What type of ground is the trail to be built in. Best estimate of what cannot be seen on surface.


Check all that apply.


Bedrock
Common
Common with Rock
Fine / Organic

Pumice
Sand
Talus or Boulders

Please enter any extra information below.

How dense is the brush in this trail location, see definitions for explanation.


Check all that apply.


None
Extra Light
Light

Medium
Heavy
Extra Heavy

Please enter any extra information below.

How dense is the timber in this trail location, see definitions for explanation.


Check all that apply.


None
Extra Light
Light

Medium
Heavy
Extra Heavy

Please enter any extra information below.

Will there be clearing of brush and timber on this project?


Select One.


Yes   No

Please enter any extra information below.

What will be the primary user of this trail be?


Check all that apply.


ATV / Motorcycle
Bicycle
Equestrian

Handicapped
Pedestrian

Please enter any extra information below.

What will be the secondary user for this trail?


Check all that apply.


ATV / Motorcycle
Auto
Bicycle

Equestrian
N/A

Please enter any extra information below.

Please select which bridge type would best suite the needs of the trail.


Check all that apply.


Cable Suspension
Cable Deck
Cable Stayed
Deck Girder
Deck Truss
Side Girder

Side Truss
Deck Arch
Suspended Arch
Single Unit
Single Unit Minor

Please enter any extra information below.

Existing Bridge Condition


Check all that apply.


Alter Function
Decommission
Expansion
Install New

Repair / Rehab
Replace in-kind
Routine Maintenance
No Action Required

Please enter any extra information below.

Bridge Width


Check all that apply.


<12 inches
13-18 inches
19-24 inches
25-36 inches
37-48 inches

49-60 inches
61-96 inches
97-120 inches
>121 inches

Please enter any extra information below.

Bridge Soil Type


Check all that apply.


Bedrock
Common
Common with Rock
Fine / Organic

Pumice
Sand
Talus or Boulders

Please enter any extra information below.

Structure at either extreme end of a bridge that supports the super structure (sill, stringers, trusses, or deck).


Check all that apply.


None
Concrete
Metal

Rock Cribbing
Wood Cribbing
Other

Please enter any extra information below.

Bridge Construction Materials


Check all that apply.


None
Extra Light
Light

Medium
Heavy
Extra Heavy

Please enter any extra information below.

Tread Width


Select One


<12 inches
13-18 inches
19-24 inches
25-36 inches
37-48 inches

49-60 inches
61-96 inches
96-120 inches
>121 incehs

Please enter any extra information below.

Surface Type


Check all that apply.


Native Material
Aggregate Surface
Asphalt
Chunk Wood

Concrete
RipRap
Imported Clay
Other Surfaces

Please enter any extra information below.

Puncheon Bridge Type


Check all that apply.


Without Decking
With Decking
Step & Run
Boardwalk

Please enter any extra information below.

Retaining Wall Types


Check all that apply.


Gabion
Geo-Textile Wall
Log Crib
Stacked Rock

Please enter any extra information below.

Type


Check all that apply.


Crib Ladder
Log Riser Stairway
Pinned Stairway

Plank Stairway
Rock Stairway
Treated Timber Stairs

Please enter any extra information below.

Tread Width


Select One


<12 inches
13-18 inches
19-24 inches
25-36 inches
37-48 inches

49-60 inches
61-96 inches
96-120 inches
>121 incehs

Please enter any extra information below.

Turnpike Type


Check all that apply.


Wood Retainer
Rock Retainer

Please enter any extra information below.

Tread Width


Select One


<12 inches
13-18 inches
19-24 inches
25-36 inches
37-48 inches

49-60 inches
61-96 inches
96-120 inches
>121 incehs

Please enter any extra information below.

A turn which is constructed on a grade of 15 % or less when measured between the exterior boundaries of the turn and follows the grade as it changes the direction of the trail.



Enter the radius in feet below.




Please enter any extra information below.

An Individual Step is a single structure either stone or wood that provides a stable vertical rise on the trail.



Select which types would be needed for your trail.


Concrete
Log
Rock
Treated timber

Please enter any extra information below.

Restriction Devices are any structure designed to restrict traffic to user groups, or to close an area to use.


Select which types would be needed for your trail.


Barricade
Barrier
Stile

Fence
Gate

Please enter any extra information below.

If you need a sign or two, which all trails do, take a look at the options below and select which might work best for your trail.


Check all that apply.


Boundry Sign
Guide / Destination
Information
Interpretive
Kiosk
Regulatory
Rock Cairn

Route Blaze
Router Post
Sheepherders Cairn
Tree Blaze
Warning Sign
Other

Please enter any extra information below.

What type of materials would best suit this trail?


Check all that apply.


Aluminum
Cedar
Composite
Native Sawn Wood
Native Log
Oak
Plastic
Plywood Default

Redwood
Rock
Steel
Treated Log
Treated Sawn Wood
None
Other

Please enter any extra information below.

What type of post would best fit the trial you're building?


Check all that apply.


Composite
Live Tree
Native Wood
Steel
Treated Wood (Default)
Other

Please enter any extra information below.

Stream Ford


Check all that apply.


No Retainer
Log Retainer
Rock Retainer

Please enter any extra information below.

Will the ford have stepping stones?


Select One


Has Stepping Stones
No Stepping Stones

Please enter any extra information below.

A switchback is a sharp turn in a trail (usually constructed on a cross slope of 15% or greater) to reverse the direction of travel and gain elevation. The landing or "apron" is the turning portion of the switchback. The approaches aare the trail sections upgrade and downgrade from the landing.


Check all that apply.


Type 1
Type 2
Type 3

Please enter any extra information below.

What is the radius of the turn in feet?



Enter the radius in feet below.




Please enter any extra information below.

What types of barriers would fit the trail best?


Check all that apply.


Log
Rock
None

Please enter any extra information below.

How high will the retaining wall be?



Retaining wall in square feet




Please enter any extra information below.

Waterbars


Check all that apply.


Native Log
Rock
Treated Timber
Rubber Belting

Please enter any extra information below.



Trail Builder Form

Welcome to the Donald Hays, Trail Contractor Inc. Trail Builder form.

Select the slider tabs on the left and answer each section as best you can. As you click each section detailed information about each will be displayed over on this side.

So, lets get started! Click the first section labeled "Basic Information" on the left.

Basic Information

Please let us know the person interested in having a trial built and where.

Trail Terms

Trail Use Type

How will the trail be used? Please select which best describes how the trail will be used.

Equestrian Clearing

Trail Condition

The general overall appearance of the trail system as dictated by the user group. Condition will be subjective to the user group I.e.. wheel chairs, horses or mountain bikes, and degree of perceived degradation. New trails use "install new".

What type of ground is the trail to be built in. Best estimate of what cannot be seen on surface.

Trail Type Descriptions

Routine maintenance
Trail feature is functioning within standards as designed and is within normal maintenance cycle. Cost is generally between 10% and 20% of replacement.

Repair/Rehab
Trail feature is in disrepair, may or may not be useable, but needs to be repaired to bring feature to standard. Cost generally between 21% and 50% of replacement.

Replace in-kind
Trail feature is dysfunctional and is beyond it's designated lifecycle or generally has deteriorated to a point where it is unable to perform as designed or constructed. Cost generally over 51% of new construction and includes demolition, restoration, and removal of existing segment or item.

Decommission
Trail feature is not needed for the operation of the trail, or is inappropriate for the setting and should be removed from system with no replacement.

Expansion
Trail feature is basically functioning as designed but is undersized. Would typically be lengthened or widened, but in some cases size may be reduced.

Alter function
Trail feature must be modified to change function to either increase capacity, change function, or durability.

Install new
Trail feature is missing or new trail feature is needed.

Trail Reconstruction

Tread Width

The overall width of the trail to be built or reconstructed.

Trail Cross Section

Surface Type

What the final walking surface will be composed of.

Hardened trails

Percent of Grade

What will be the degree of difficulty be on this trail. Standard walking trail's percent of grades do not exceed 8% with short segments not exceeding 12 percent in 100 feet. Mountain bike downhill courses may exceed 12%.

Grade Dip

Percent of Side Slope

Side slope is the angle 90 degrees to the trail line. In other words how steep is the hill beside you as you walk.

Slope and Finish

Soil Type

What type of ground is the trail to be built in. Best estimate of what cannot be seen on surface.

Soil Type Descriptions

Bedrock:
Trailbed is bedrock or very large boulders, larger than a small car. Blasting is generally the only option to create a level walking surface.

Common:
Trailbed is bedrock or very large boulders, larger than a small car. Blasting is generally the only option to create a level walking surface.

Common with Rock:
Trailbed soil is with a good mixture of clays, fines, and small rock intermixed with larger rocks or small boulders. May be loose or highly compacted. Removal of larger rocks may include prying out, digging or breaking in place.

Fine / Organic:
Trailbed soils are uniform fine texture with little or no rock content. May be dark with high organic content. Demonstrates low carrying capacity, especially when wet. Trenches easily, highly dusty when dry, highly erosive.

Pumice:
Trailbed is broken cobbles with few or no fines. Does not compact. Highly susceptable to erosion, particularly with ability to float in water.

Sand:
Trailbed soil may be uniform sand-grain testure with few fines. Refuses to compact when dry. Highly susceptable to erosion.

Talus or Boulders:
Trailbed material is mostly rock of uniform or varying sizes containing little or no soil. Removal is required by hand, machine or blasting. Trail bed may be built over the top of rocks and imported materials and geotextiles used instead or removal.


Brush Type

How dense is the brush in this trail location, see definitions for explanation.

Brush Type Descriptions

None:
No brush or grasses within trail corridor.

Extra Light:
Grass, light perennials, or other non-woody plants. Capable of being worked with mower or power brush cutter.

Ligh:
Small brush shorter than knee height, slow growing woody brush diameter typically no greater than 1/2 inch. Capable of being cut with large mower or motorized brush cutter.

Medium:
Faster growing woody brush with diameters typically between 1/2 inch and 1 inch and heights lower than chest high. Typically cut with hand loppers, motorized brush cutter, chainsaws or specialized mower.

Heavy:
Fast growing brush above head high with typical diameters greater than 1 inch. Typically cut with chainsaws, large brush cutters or specialized mower.

Extra Heavy:
Very dense and fast growing brush above head high with diameters greater than 2 inches. Typically cut with chainsaws, or hand loppers.


Timber

How dense is the timber in this trail location, see definitions for explanation.

Timber Type Descriptions

None:
Meadow or opening where no trees could fall within trail corridor

Extra Light:
Open scattered timber where some trees may fall into trail corridor.

Light:
Low density (greater than 10 foot spacing) small diameter 4 inch to 12 inch trees. Trail location would avoid cutting most trees. Most likely young stable and maturing live trees.

Medium:
Moderately dense (6-10 ft spacing) small to medium 4 inch to 18 inch diamenter trees or dense (less than 6 ft spacing) small diameter trees. Dead trees starting to be noticable. Relocations would likely require a substantial number of small to medium trees to be removed. Typically maturing to mature trees.

Heavy:
Moderately dense large diameter (18 to 36 inch) trees or dense medium diameter (12 to 24 inch) trees. Dead trees may be substantial or fire burned small to medium diameter trees. Relocations would likely require removal of many medium to large diameter trees. Typically mature timber.

Extra Heavy:
Moderately dense large diameter (18 to 36 inch) trees or dense medium diameter (12 to 24 inch) trees. Dead trees may be substantial or fire burned small to medium diameter trees. Relocations would likely require removal of many medium to large diameter trees. Typically mature timber.


Clearing

Will there be clearing of brush and timber on this project.

Please let us know any extra details about fallen timber or brush clearing that would be needed.

Clearing

Primary User

What user will be using this trail system the most, or what user will be impacting it the most. Trail Contractor will use this information to follow design standards.


Secondary User

What user will be the using the trail system with less frequency, may or may not be a "legal" user. Example; equestrians and mountain bikes will need different design standards


Bridges

A structure, including abutments and supports, erected over a depression (canyon, chasm, river, road, or stream) and having a deck for carrying road or trail traffic. If the bridge is over 30 inches above the surface, it should have railings.


Bridge Types

A structure, including abutments and supports, erected over a depression (canyon, chasm, river, road, or stream) and having a deck for carrying road or trail traffic. If the bridge is over 30 inches above the surface, it should have railings.

Bridge Type Descriptions

Cable Suspension:
Cable suspension bridges are supported by two main steel cables. The deck is hung from suspender cables or steel rods. Decks are usually sawn timber planks. The cables are anchored into the stream banks and are supported by intermediate towers

Cable Deck:
Deck cable bridges are supported by two main steel cables. The deck is also supported on the two main cables. The cables are anchored to the abutments and may or may not be supported by intermediate towers. Decks are usually sawn timber planks

Cable Stayed:
Cable stayed bridges are supported by multiple steel cables connected to the tops of one or more sets of towers. Decks may be timber, concrete, or steel grid.

Deck Girder:
Deck girder bridges are supported by two or more longitudinal girders (beams). Decks are supported on the tops of the girders and are usually timber (log, sawn or glulam), but may be concrete or steel.

Deck Truss:
Deck truss (pony truss) bridges are supported by two longitudinal trusses. The deck is hung on the interior side of the trusses. The trusses usually function as all, or part of, the handrail system. Decks are usually sawn timber plank, but may be glued-laminated timber, concrete, steel, or fiberglass.

Side Girder:
Side girder bridges are supported by two longitudinal girders (beams). The deck is hung on the interior side of the girders either on floor beams or ledger beams attached to the main girders. Deck planks will be transverse when ledgers are used or longitudinal when floor beams are used. Larger bridges may use longitudinal stringers on top of the floor beam. The girders usually function as all, or part of the handrail system. Decks are usually timber (sawn plank or glued laminated), but may be concrete or steel.

Side Truss:
Side truss (pony truss) bridges are supported by two longitudinal trusses. The deck is hung on the interior side of the trusses. The trusses usually function as all, or part of, the handrail system. Decks are usually sawn timber plank, but may be glued-laminated timber, concrete, steel, or fiberglass.

Deck Arch:
Decks are supported by longitudinal beams or walls that are supported by the arches.

Suspended Arch:
Cable suspension bridges are supported by two main steel cables. The deck is hung from suspender cables or steel rods. Decks are usually sawn timber planks. The cables are anchored into the streambanks and are supported by intermediate towers.

Single Unit:
Single unit bridges are bridges in which the bridge is a single, self-supporting unit.

Single Unit Minor:
Single unit bridges are bridges in which the bridge is a single, self-supporting unit.


Existing Bridge Condition

Content Content Content Content Content Content Content

Existing Brdige Condition Descriptions

Alter Function:
Trail feature must be modified to change function to either increase capacity, change function, or durability.

Decommission:
Trail feature is not needed for the operation of the trail, or is inappropriate for the setting and should be removed from system with no replacement.

Expansion:
Trail feature is basically functioning as designed but is undersized. Would typically be lengthened or widened, but in some cases size may be reduced.

Install New:
Trail feature is missing or new trail feature is needed.

Repair / Rehab:
Trail feature is in disrepair, may or may not be useable, but needs to be repaired to bring feature to standard. Cost generally between 21% and 50% of replacement.

Replace in-kind:
Trail feature is dysfunctional and is beyond it's designated lifecycle or generally has deteriorated to a point where it is unable to perform as designed or constructed. Cost generally over 51% of new construction and includes demolition, restoration, and removal of existing segment or item.

Routine Maintenance:
Trail feature is functioning within standards as designed and is within normal maintenance cycle. Cost is generally between 10% and 20% of replacement.


Bridge Width

Please let us know the prefered width of the bridge.


Soil Type

What type of ground is the trail to be built in. Best estimate of what cannot be seen on surface.

Soil Type Descriptions

Bedrock:
Trailbed is bedrock or very large boulders, larger than a small car. Blasting is generally the only option to create a level walking surface.

Common:
Trailbed is bedrock or very large boulders, larger than a small car. Blasting is generally the only option to create a level walking surface.

Common with Rock:
Trailbed soil is with a good mixture of clays, fines, and small rock intermixed with larger rocks or small boulders. May be loose or highly compacted. Removal of larger rocks may include prying out, digging or breaking in place.

Fine / Organic:
Trailbed soils are uniform fine texture with little or no rock content. May be dark with high organic content. Demonstrates low carrying capacity, especially when wet. Trenches easily, highly dusty when dry, highly erosive.

Pumice:
Trailbed is broken cobbles with few or no fines. Does not compact. Highly susceptable to erosion, particularly with ability to float in water.

Sand:
Trailbed soil may be uniform sand-grain testure with few fines. Refuses to compact when dry. Highly susceptable to erosion.

Talus or Boulders:
Trailbed material is mostly rock of uniform or varying sizes containing little or no soil. Removal is required by hand, machine or blasting. Trail bed may be built over the top of rocks and imported materials and geotextiles used instead or removal.


Abutments

Structure at either extreme end of a bridge that supports the superstructure (sill, stringers, trusses, or deck).

Abutment Type Descriptions

Concrete:
Concrete retaining wall abutments are earth-retaining structures that also support the trail bridge superstructure.

Metal:
Metal retaining wall abutments are earth-retaining structures that also support the trail bridge superstructure.

Rock Cribbing:
Rock retaining wall abutments are earth-retaining structures that also support the trail bridge superstructure.

Wood Cribbing:
Wood sill abutments are a single element foundation supporting the bridge superstructure.

Other:
Something other than available selections. Please describe in text box below.


Construction Materials

Please select what type of materials will be or are already used.


Grid Blocks

A trail hardening structure made of concrete, measuring 18 inches by 24 inches set to grade and backfilled to support traffic in boggy or soft native material areas such as meadows. This structure may be used instead of puncheon bridges or turnpikes where building a raised trail bed is not desirable.

Grid Blocks

Tread Width

The width of ther portion of the trail used for travel.


Surface Type

The actual surface portion of the trail upon which users travel excluding backslope, ditch, and shoulder.

Surface Type Descriptions

Native Material:
Tread made from clearing and grubbing, grading the native soil with no added surfacing materials.

Aggregate Surface:
Surface material made up of broken rock, gravel sand, and clay.

Asphalt:
Asphalt...

Chunk Wood:
Shredded wood.

Concrete:
Concrete...

RipRap:
A layer of stones placed ramdomly on a trail tread to provice support and prevent erosion.

Imported Clay:
A firm, fine-grained earth, plastic when wet, composed chiefly of hydrous aluminum silicate minerials.

Other Surfaces:
Please explain in the text box below.


Puncheon Bridges

A log or timber structure built on the ground for the purpose of crossing a boggy area. Usually consists of sills, stringers, decking, and often a soil or loose gravel tread laid on top of the decking.

Puncheon Bridge example 1 Puncheon Bridge 1
Puncheon Bridge example 2 Puncheon Bridge 2

Puncheon Bridge Types

Please select the bridge type.


Retaining Walls

A structure used at a grade change to hold soil on the uphill side from slumping, sliding, or falling, usually made of log or stone, Also used to provide stability and strength to the outside edge of a trail.

Rock Walls

Retaining Wall Types

Types of retaining walls

Gabion:
Containers wired together, and filled with rocks to make quick retaining walls for erosion control. Usually made of heavy gage galvanized wire.

Geo-Textile Wall:
A geotextile is a synthetic permeable textile material used with soil, rock, or any other geotechnical engineering related material. Geotextiles, also called geosynthetics, are generally simi-impervious nonwoven petrochemical fabric cloth that provices a stable base ofr the application of soil or gravel. Used primarily in raised trialbeds or retaining walls.

Log Crib:
Stacked interlocking logs forming a vertical wall.
Log Crib Retaining Wall Log Walls

Stacked Rock:
Large rocks stack in a stable vertical manner.
Rock Retaining Wall Rock Walls


Stairways

A structure either rock or wood that provides a stable vertical rise on the trail, usually in sets.

Treated Timber Stairway Example Stairway

Stairway Types

Stairway Types


Tread Width

The width of ther portion of the trail used for travel.


Turnpike

Also know as a Causeway. A structure for raising the trail bed above wet, boggy areas by placing mineral soil over filter fabric between parallel side retainers. The tread must be "crowned" and ditches dug alongside the retainers to provide drainage.

Turnpike Example 1 Turnpike 1 Turnpike Example 2 Turnpike 2

Turnpike Type

Turnpike Type


Tread Width

The width of ther portion of the trail used for travel.


Climbing Turn

A turn which is constructed on a grade of 15 % or less when measured between the exterior boundries of the turn and follows the grade as it changes the direction of the trail .

Climbing Turn Example Climbing Turn

Climbing Turn

A turn which is constructed on a grade of 15 % or less when measured between the exterior boundries of the turn and follows the grade as it changes the direction of the trail.


Individual Step

A single structure either stone or wood that provides a stable vertical rise on the trail.


Individual Step Type

A single structure either stone or wood that provides a stable vertical rise on the trail.


Restriction Devices

Restriction Devices are any structure designed to restrict traffic to user groups, or to close an area to use.


Restriction Device Type

Restriction Devices are any structure designed to restrict traffic to user groups, or to close an area to use.


Signs

If you need a sign or two, which all trails do, take a look at the options to the left and select which might work best for your trail.


Sign Types

If you need a sign or two, which all trails do, take a look at the options to the left and select which might work best for your trail.


Sign Build Materials

What type of materials would best suit this trail?


Sign Post Material

What type of post would best fit the trial you're building?


Stream Ford

A ford is a shallow place with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading or in a vehicle.

Log Stream Ford Example Stream Ford

Stream Ford Types

See stream ford examples below.

Log Stream Ford Example Stream Ford Rock Stream Ford Example Stream Ford

Stepping Stones

Would you like stepping stones in your stream ford?


Switchbacks

A sharp turn in a trail (usually constructed on a cross slope of 15% or greater) to reverse the direction of travel and gain elevation. The landing or "apron" is the turning portion of the switchback. The approaches aare the trail sections upgrade and downgrade from the landing.


Switchback Types

A sharp turn in a trail (usually constructed on a cross slope of 15% or greater) to reverse the direction of travel and gain elevation. The landing or "apron" is the turning portion of the switchback. The approaches aare the trail sections upgrade and downgrade from the landing.

Switchback 1 Switchback 1 Switchback 2 Switchback 2 Switchback 2 Switchback 3

Switchback Radius

What is the preferred radius of your switchback?


Switchback Barriers

What is the preferred barrier for your switchback?


Switchback Retaining Walls

How high would the retaining walls need to be in feed?


Waterbars

A drainage structure (for diverting water off trail) composed of an outsloped segment of trail or road tread leading to a barrier placed at an angle of 45 degrees - 60 degrees to the trail. Structures are usually made of peeled log, stone, concrete, or rubber belting material. Water flowing down trail will be diverted by the outlsope or, as a last resort, by barrier. Waterbars are generally built on locations where drain dips or grade dips will fail due to steepness of grade.

Waterbar

Waterbar Types

Waterbar Types

Log Waterbar Waterbar Rock Waterbar Waterbar Rubber Belting Waterbar Waterbar